EFFECTS OF REPEATED SPRINT TRAINING ON ISOCAPNIC BUFFERING PHASE IN VOLLEYBALL PLAYERS


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Erylmaz S. , KAYNAK K., Polat M., Aydogan S.

REVISTA BRASILEIRA DE MEDICINA DO ESPORTE, vol.24, no.4, pp.286-290, 2018 (Journal Indexed in SCI) identifier identifier

  • Publication Type: Article / Article
  • Volume: 24 Issue: 4
  • Publication Date: 2018
  • Doi Number: 10.1590/1517-869220182404185842
  • Title of Journal : REVISTA BRASILEIRA DE MEDICINA DO ESPORTE
  • Page Numbers: pp.286-290
  • Keywords: Oxygen consumption, Anaerobic threshold, Hyperventilation, Acidosis, RESPIRATORY COMPENSATION POINT, INCREMENTAL EXERCISE, ANAEROBIC THRESHOLD, DISTANCE RUNNERS, INTERVAL, CAPACITY, PERFORMANCE, LACTATE, HYPERVENTILATION, INTENSITY

Abstract

Introduction:The region between the ventilatory threshold (VT) and respiratory compensation point (RCP) is defined as the isocapnic buffering (ICB) phase and represents a phase of compensation for exercise-induced metabolic acidosis. There is sparse literature examining the effects of physical training on ICB phase in athletes. Objectives:The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a repeated sprint training program on the ICB phase of college volleyball players. Methods: Eighteen male volleyball players were randomly assigned to either an experimental group (n=9) or a control group (n=9) and followed a traditional volleyball training program three times per week for six weeks. The experimental group additionally performed a repeated sprint training protocol immediately before each volleyball training session. Before and after the 6-week training period, all participants performed an incremental treadmill test to determine VT, RCP, and maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max). The ICB phases were calculated as VO2(ml/kg/min) and sprint speed (km/h). Results:The experimental group showed significant improvements in ICB phase, RCP, VO2max and maximal sprint speed after training (p<0.01). There were no significant changes in VT after training in the experimental group (p>0.05). None of these variables changed significantly in the control group (p>0.05). Conclusions: These findings indicate that repeated sprint training can enhance the ICB phase of volleyball players, which may be attributable to an improvement in buffering capacity leading to a shift in RCP towards higher intensities without any change in VT. The increase in the ICB phase may an important factor in terms of improvement in the high-intensity exercise tolerance of athletes.