Determination of plasma concentrations of organochlorine pesticides and polychlorinated biphenyls in pet cats and dogs


Yavuz O., Arslan H. H., Esin C., Das Y. K., Aksoy A.

TOXICOLOGY AND INDUSTRIAL HEALTH, vol.34, no.8, pp.541-553, 2018 (SCI-Expanded) identifier identifier identifier

  • Publication Type: Article / Article
  • Volume: 34 Issue: 8
  • Publication Date: 2018
  • Doi Number: 10.1177/0748233718773182
  • Journal Name: TOXICOLOGY AND INDUSTRIAL HEALTH
  • Journal Indexes: Science Citation Index Expanded (SCI-EXPANDED), Scopus
  • Page Numbers: pp.541-553
  • Keywords: Organochlorine pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls, plasma, cat, dog, HUMAN-MILK, ORGANOHALOGENATED CONTAMINANTS, PERSISTENT ORGANOCHLORINES, ACCUMULATION FEATURES, CANIS-FAMILIARIS, ADIPOSE-TISSUE, HUMAN EXPOSURE, TURKEY, POLLUTANTS, SENTINELS
  • Çukurova University Affiliated: No

Abstract

The aim of this study was the determination of plasma concentrations of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in cats and dogs and evaluation of their prevalence and possible effects. The concentrations of nine OCPs, such as -hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH), beta-HCH, gamma-HCH, hexachlorobenzene (HCB), aldrin, 2,4'-dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (2,4'-DDT), 4,4'-DDT, 2,4'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (2,4'-DDE) and 4,4'-DDE and 16 PCBs (PCB-28, -52, -70, -74, -81, -99, -101, -118, -138, -153, -156, -170, -180, -183, -187 and -208) were evaluated in the plasma samples of pet cats (n = 15) and dogs (n = 21). The concentrations of OCPs ranged from 1.12 ng g(-1) lipid weight (lw) to 7.65 ng g(-1) lw in cats and from 1.25 ng g(-1) lw to 6.79 ng g(-1) lw in dogs. In addition, mean PCB levels were 0.58-5.66 and 0.52-6.62 ng g(-1) lw in cats and dogs, respectively. beta-HCH, gamma-HCH and PCB-138 levels were significantly higher in dogs (p < 0.05). As far as could be determined, OCPs and PCBs were detected in the plasma samples of domestic cats and dogs in Turkey for the first time. Their concentrations were similar to those reported in earlier studies abroad. However, in contrast to other research, the levels of some OCPs were higher in dogs than in cats. It is concluded that, because of their high prevalence and potential health effects in animals and humans, OCP and PCB levels should be monitored systematically in domestic cats and dogs.