Neither got a good bill of musculoskeletal health: a comparative study among medical and dental students


BENLIDAYI I. C. , AL-BAYATI Z., GÜZEL R. , SARPEL T.

ACTA CLINICA BELGICA, cilt.74, ss.110-114, 2019 (SCI İndekslerine Giren Dergi) identifier identifier identifier

  • Cilt numarası: 74 Konu: 2
  • Basım Tarihi: 2019
  • Doi Numarası: 10.1080/17843286.2018.1483564
  • Dergi Adı: ACTA CLINICA BELGICA
  • Sayfa Sayısı: ss.110-114

Özet

Objectives: It has been well established that musculoskeletal complaints are common among dentistry students. However, data regarding the comparison of overall musculoskeletal health between dental and medical students is scarce. The objective of the current study was to compare musculoskeletal health between medical and dental students. Methods: The population of the current study was comprised of fourth- and fifth-year students from medical and dental faculties of the same university who were at least three months in clinical training. Self-administered multi-item questionnaires regarding the musculoskeletal complaints were distributed to these students. A comparative analysis was carried out on the responses derived from the medical and dental students. Results: A total of 219 students completed the questionnaire, yielding a response rate of 81.1%. Almost four fifth (80.4%) of the students reported musculoskeletal pain, with frequencies of 85.9 and 75.8% in dental and medical students, respectively (p > 0.05). Total, upper extremity and neck VAS scores were significantly higher in dental students than those in medical students (p < 0.01, p p < 0.05, respectively). The rate of mild-severe pain sufferers in the upper extremity was also higher among dental students (p < 0.001). Conclusion: Musculoskeletal pain is frequent in both medical and dental students. However, the intensity of pain - particularly for the upper extremity and neck - is higher among dental students. The findings of the current study might be attributed to the fact that dental education requires more physical burden during routine clinical training than medical education.