Enhancement of maize plant growth with inoculation of phosphate-solubilizing bacteria and biochar amendment in soil


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Rafique M., Sultan T., ORTAŞ İ. , Chaudhary H. J.

SOIL SCIENCE AND PLANT NUTRITION, cilt.63, ss.460-469, 2017 (SCI İndekslerine Giren Dergi) identifier identifier

  • Cilt numarası: 63 Konu: 5
  • Basım Tarihi: 2017
  • Doi Numarası: 10.1080/00380768.2017.1373599
  • Dergi Adı: SOIL SCIENCE AND PLANT NUTRITION
  • Sayfa Sayısı: ss.460-469

Özet

Maize plant has an absolute requirement of nutrients (N, P, and K) for growth and development. The microbial application can facilitate in addressing limited access to chemical fertilizer concern. Moreover, biochar and phosphorus-solubilizing bacterial (PSB) community can contribute together in nutrient availability. Both have the P-supply potential to the soil, but their interaction has been tested less under semiarid climatic conditions. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the potential of biochemically tested promising PSB strains and biochar for maize plant growth and nutritional status in plant and soil. Therefore, two isolated PSB strains from maize rhizosphere were biochemically tested in vitro and identified by 16S rDNA gene analysis. The experiment was conducted in the greenhouse where the plant growth and nutrient availability to the plants were observed. In this regard, all the treatments such as PSB strain-inoculated plants, biochar-treated plants, and a combination of PSBs + biochartreated plants were destructively sampled on day 45 (D-45) and day 65 (D-65) of sowing with four replications at each time. PSB inoculation, biochar incorporation, and their combinations have positive effects on maize plant height and nutrient concentration on D-45 and D-65. In particular, plants treated with sawdust biochar + Lysinibacillus fusiformis strain 31MZR inoculation increased N (32.8%), P (72.5%), and K (42.1%) against control on D-65. Besides that, only L. fusiformis strain 31MZR inoculation enhanced N (23.1%) and P (61.5%) than control which shows the significant interaction of PSB and biochar in nutrient uptake. PSB and biochar have the potential to be used as a promising amendment in improving plant growth and nutrient absorption besides the conventional approaches.

Maize plant has an absolute requirement of nutrients (N, P, and K) for growth and development. The microbial application can facilitate in addressing limited access to chemical fertilizer concern. Moreover, biochar and phosphorus-solubilizing bacterial (PSB) community can contribute together in nutrient availability. Both have the P-supply potential to the soil, but their interaction has been tested less under semiarid climatic conditions. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the potential of biochemically tested promising PSB strains and biochar for maize plant growth and nutritional status in plant and soil. Therefore, two isolated PSB strains from maize rhizosphere were biochemically tested in vitro and identified by 16S rDNA gene analysis. The experiment was conducted in the greenhouse where the plant growth and nutrient availability to the plants were observed. In this regard, all the treatments such as PSB strain-inoculated plants, biochar-treated plants, and a combination of PSBs + biochartreated plants were destructively sampled on day 45 (D-45) and day 65 (D-65) of sowing with four replications at each time. PSB inoculation, biochar incorporation, and their combinations have positive effects on maize plant height and nutrient concentration on D-45 and D-65. In particular, plants treated with sawdust biochar + Lysinibacillus fusiformis strain 31MZR inoculation increased N (32.8%), P (72.5%), and K (42.1%) against control on D-65. Besides that, only L. fusiformis strain 31MZR inoculation enhanced N (23.1%) and P (61.5%) than control which shows the significant interaction of PSB and biochar in nutrient uptake. PSB and biochar have the potential to be used as a promising amendment in improving plant growth and nutrient absorption besides the conventional approaches.