Tilbaşar’da Yeni Kazılar (2015-2018): Başlıca Sonuçlar


Creative Commons License

Genç E.

MORS IMMATURA Amanosların Gölgesinde Hayriye Akıl Anı Kitabı/ In the Shadow of Amanus, In Memoriam Hayriye Akıl, K. Serdar Girginer, Gonca Dardeniz, Ayça Gerçek, Fatih Erhan, Elif Genç, İrfan Tuğcu, Özlem Oyman-Girginer, M. Cem Fırat, Hakan Gerçek ve M.Furkan Tufan, Editör, Ege Yayınları, İstanbul, ss.181-194, 2020

  • Basım Tarihi: 2020
  • Yayınevi: Ege Yayınları
  • Basıldığı Şehir: İstanbul
  • Sayfa Sayıları: ss.181-194
  • Editörler: K. Serdar Girginer, Gonca Dardeniz, Ayça Gerçek, Fatih Erhan, Elif Genç, İrfan Tuğcu, Özlem Oyman-Girginer, M. Cem Fırat, Hakan Gerçek ve M.Furkan Tufan, Editör

Özet

Tilbeshar, an ancient hill that is located about 32 km southeast of the province of Gaziantep, is one of the most important Bronze Age towns that dominate the Oguzeli (Tilbeshar) Plain, which is irrigated by Sacır Suyu, one of the western branches of the Euphrates River. Tilbeshar, a town that was settled from the Neolithic period, with its two lower towns, reached a width of approximately 56 hectares from the second quarter of the Early Bronze Age, and it took its place among the important towns of this region. After the shrinkage in the city at the beginning of the Middle Bronze Age, the city developed again in the Middle Bronze II. The resettlement activities occurred during the Achaemenid and Byzantine periods, and finally, the third and last settlement in this area in the medieval gave a final important aspect to this town, once more. Excavations after the survey researches beginning in 1994 were carried out in Tilbeshar until 2006, and after nine years, Tilbeshar excavations were resumed in 2015 within the scope of a mission to protect the cultural assets of the Doğanpınar Dam. The rescue excavations were conducted in the eastern part of the South Lower City, which would be affected by the dam water, for four years. The researches focused on exposing the settlement plan of the Bronze Age Lower City on a large area and identifying the city walls. Five residential levels, which continued through from the second quarter of the Early Bronze Age to the end, were identified in the focused area and one of them had been affected by the fire. The city wall, rising on the superimposed soil, which is surrounding the lower city were identified, dated to the same period. 163 meters of the city wall which are built in a casemate system, is unearthed. The fortress, which has two building phases, is 5 and 6 m thick and has 23 casemate rooms with a small gate. The city wall rising above the superimposed soil dated to the Early Bronze Age in the Euphrates valley. The city wall of Tilbeshar is noteworthy that it is the only one which was excavated extensively in the region. The Middle Bronze Age is represented only by simple earth tombs. The graves contain rich findings which have unique features in its period. All of these findings provide new outcomes for Tilbeshar and also contribute to the Bronze Age of the region. This study includes the information about recent excavations and the finds in Tilbeshar, and it is dedicated to my dear friend and colleague Hayriye Akıl who we lost in 2016.