EXPLORING STUDENT TEACHER BELIEF DEVELOPMENT: AN ALTERNATIVE CONSTRUCTIVIST TECHNIQUE, SNAKE INTERVIEWS, EXEMPLIFIED AND EVALUATED


CABAROĞLU N. , Denicolo P.

Personal Construct Theory and Practice, no.5, pp.28-40, 2008 (Refereed Journals of Other Institutions)

  • Publication Type: Article / Article
  • Publication Date: 2008
  • Title of Journal : Personal Construct Theory and Practice
  • Page Numbers: pp.28-40

Abstract

This paper reports the results of a naturalistic inquiry into student teachers’ beliefs about teaching and learning

with a particular focus on one constructivist technique used in data collection: Snake Interviews. Although

a sequence of three in-depth interviews was conducted as a dominant data collection strategy in the

main study, the Snake interviews proved to be very useful in answering some of the questions that arose at

one particular stage of the study when other techniques apparently revealed contradictions. That main study

addressed issues in the literature about the impact of pre-service teacher education programmes on teachers’

beliefs about teaching and learning: that information in coursework and in the classroom is perceived, processed

and acted upon through those beliefs (Clark & Peterson, 1986; Munby, 1982), that these beliefs are inflexible

(Kagan, 1992), and that pre-service teacher education programmes are “not very powerful interventions”

(Zeichner et al., 1987, p. 28).