Activities of iron-containing enzymes in leaves of two tomato genotypes differing in their resistance to Fe chlorosis


Dasgan H. , Ozturk L., Abak K., Cakmak I.

JOURNAL OF PLANT NUTRITION, cilt.26, ss.1997-2007, 2003 (SCI İndekslerine Giren Dergi) identifier identifier

  • Cilt numarası: 26
  • Basım Tarihi: 2003
  • Doi Numarası: 10.1081/pln-120024259
  • Dergi Adı: JOURNAL OF PLANT NUTRITION
  • Sayfa Sayıları: ss.1997-2007

Özet

Two tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill., cvs. Pakmor and Target) genotypes differing in resistance to iron (Fe) deficiency were grown in nutrient solution under controlled environmental conditions over 50 days to study the relationships between severity of leaf chlorosis, total concentration of Fe, and activities of Fe-containing enzymes in leaves. The activities of Fe-containing enzymes ascorbate peroxidase, catalase, and guaiacol peroxidase, and additionaly the activity of glutathione reductase, an enzyme that does not contain Fe, were measured. Plants were supplied with 2 x 10(-7) M (Fe deficient) and 10(-4) M (Fe sufficient) FeEDTA, respectively. Leaf chlorosis appeared more rapidly and severely in Target (Fe deficiency senstive genotype) than Pakmor (Fe deficiency resistant genotype). On day 50, Pakmor had 2-fold more chlorophyll than Target under Fe deficiency, while at adequate supply of Fe the two genotypes were very similar in chlorophyll concentration. Despite distinct differences in development of leaf chlorosis and chlorophyll concentrations, Pakmor and Target were very similar in concentrations of total Fe under Fe deficiency. In contrast to Fe concentration, activities of Fe-containing enzymes were closely related to the severity of leaf chlorosis. The Fe-containing enzymes studied, especially catalase, showed a close relationship with the concentration of chlorophyll and thus differential sensitivity of tomato genotypes to Fe deficiency. Glutathione reductase did not show relationship between Fe deficiency chlorosis and enzyme activity. The results confirm that measurement of Fe-containing enzymes in leaves is more reliable than the total concentration of Fe for characterization of Fe nutritional status of plants and for assessing genotypical differences in resistance to Fe deficiency. It appears that Fe deficiency-resistant genotype contains more physiologically available Fe in tissues than the genotype with high sensitivity to Fe deficiency.

Two tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill., cvs. Pakmor and Target) genotypes differing in resistance to iron (Fe) deficiency were grown in nutrient solution under controlled environmental conditions over 50 days to study the relationships between severity of leaf chlorosis, total concentration of Fe, and activities of Fe?containing enzymes in leaves. The activities of Fe?containing enzymes ascorbate peroxidase, catalase, and guaiacol peroxidase, and additionaly the activity of glutathione reductase, an enzyme that does not contain Fe, were measured. Plants were supplied with 2 × 10−7 M (Fe deficient) and 10−4 M (Fe sufficient) FeEDTA, respectively. Leaf chlorosis appeared more rapidly and severely in Target (Fe deficiency senstive genotype) than Pakmor (Fe deficiency resistant genotype). On day 50, Pakmor had 2?fold more chlorophyll than Target under Fe deficiency, while at adequate supply of Fe the two genotypes were very similar in chlorophyll concentration. Despite distinct differences in development of leaf chlorosis and chlorophyll concentrations, Pakmor and Target were very similar in concentrations of total Fe under Fe deficiency. In contrast to Fe concentration, activities of Fe?containing enzymes were closely related to the severity of leaf chlorosis. The Fe?containing enzymes studied, especially catalase, showed a close relationship with the concentration of chlorophyll and thus differential sensitivity of tomato genotypes to Fe deficiency. Glutathione reductase did not show relationship between Fe deficiency chlorosis and enzyme activity. The results confirm that measurement of Fe?containing enzymes in leaves is more reliable than the total concentration of Fe for characterization of Fe nutritional status of plants and for assessing genotypical differences in resistance to Fe deficiency. It appears that Fe deficiency?resistant genotype contains more physiologically available Fe in tissues than the genotype with high sensitivity to Fe deficiency.