Low immunity against vaccine preventable diseases in Turkish HIV cohort


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Candevir A. , Kuşcu F., Yildirim F., Kömür S. , Çiçek Şentürk G., Inal A. S. , ...More

TURKISH JOURNAL OF MEDICAL SCIENCES, vol.51, no.5, pp.2311-2317, 2021 (Journal Indexed in SCI) identifier identifier identifier

  • Publication Type: Article / Article
  • Volume: 51 Issue: 5
  • Publication Date: 2021
  • Doi Number: 10.3906/sag-2102-14
  • Title of Journal : TURKISH JOURNAL OF MEDICAL SCIENCES
  • Page Numbers: pp.2311-2317
  • Keywords: HIV, immunity, measles, mumps, rubella, tetanus, VARICELLA-ZOSTER-VIRUS, HEPATITIS-B, INFECTED PATIENTS, RISK-FACTORS, ADULT PATIENTS, MEASLES, SEROPREVALENCE, DIPHTHERIA, TETANUS, RUBELLA

Abstract

Background/aim: HIV infection increase the risk of serious disease resulting from common vaccine-preventable infections. Vaccinations are particularly important for HIV infected adults. We aimed to investigate the immunity rates against measles, mumps, rubella, hepatitis A, B, and tetanus in newly diagnosed HIV patients. Materials and methods: Patients who admitted to outpatient clinics of three centers with newly diagnosed HIV infection, between 1 January 2015 and 31 June 2017 were included. Measles, mumps, rubella, varicella zoster virus, hepatitis A, hepatitis B, and tetanus antibody levels were measured by commercial diagnostic kits. Demographical and laboratory data of the patients were recorded. Results: Five hundred and twenty-three patients were enrolled in the study. Of the patients 87% were male (n = 455) and the mean age was 38 +/- 13 years. Serology was available for measles 74.2% (388/523), mumps 73.8% (386/523), rubella 77.8% (407/523), hepatitis A 88.5% (463/523), hepatitis B 97.7% (511/523), tetanus 8.6% (45/523), and VZV 79.9% (418/523). Seropositivity was 82% for measles, 75.6% for mumps, 92.1% for rubella. Of the patients whom all three of the components of the MMR vaccine was tested, 37.7% (127/337) were susceptible at least one and needed the vaccine. Mean age was lower in patients who are nonimmune to measles and mumps (p = 0.008). Younger patients were also nonimmune for hepatitis A, while older patients were nonimmune for hepatitis B. Conclusion: In our study we found that rates of nonimmunity can increase up to one third of the patients even though there is a national vaccination program. Nonimmune individuals should be detected and vaccinated in line with recent guidelines and response should be monitored because of the possibility of impaired immunity and possible suboptimal response. National campaigns can be launched for adult immunization and physicians should be aware of the importance of adult immunization.